Category Archives: History

A Cable Survey Shows Majority Of Americans Prefer Net Neutrality 

By: Joe Brodkin of Ars Technica

As US cable companies push to eliminate or change net neutrality rules, the industry’s primary lobby group today released the results of a survey that it says shows “strong bipartisan consensus that the government should let the Internet flourish without imposing burdensome regulations.”
But proponents of keeping the current rules can find plenty to like in the survey conducted by NCTA—The Internet & Television Association. A strong majority of the 2,194 registered American voters in the survey support the current net neutrality rules that prohibit ISPs from blocking, throttling, or prioritizing online content in exchange for payment. While most opposed price regulation, a majority supported an approach in which regulators take action against ISPs on a case-by-case basis when consumers are harmed—the exact same approach the Federal Communications Commission uses under its existing net neutrality regime.

About 61 percent of respondents either “strongly” or “somewhat” support net neutrality rules that say ISPs “cannot block, throttle, or prioritize certain content on the Internet.” Only 18 percent oppose net neutrality, as the rest don’t know what it is or had no opinion.

Technically, this doesn’t contradict the official position of major cable companies like Comcast and Charter. These companies say they support the core net neutrality rules, while merely opposing the FCC’s use of its common carrier authority under Title II of the Communications Act to enforce them. But the net neutrality rules imposed in 2015 depend on Title II because of a 2014 court decision that prevented the FCC from enforcing the rules without reclassifying ISPs as Title II common carriers.
Support for protecting consumers
The first slide in the NCTA survey results trumpets broad support for “light touch” regulation. But instead of signaling broad opposition to Title II, the wording of the question shows that Americans support an approach that’s consistent with the one taken by the FCC’s then-Democratic leadership in 2015 (and which the FCC’s current Republican leadership wants to overturn).
The survey asked, “When it comes to the role of the federal government in regulating access to the Internet, which of the following comes closest to your view, even if none are exactly right?” Just 12 percent answered that “the government should have the ability to set specific prices, terms, and conditions for Internet access,” while 53 percent said, “the government should have a light-touch approach to the Internet that allows regulators to monitor the marketplace and take action if consumers are harmed.” The only other option people could choose was, “the government should not regulate the Internet at all.”

Read More ☺️

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

Turns Out The Location Of The Asteroid Was What Ended The Dinosaurs. 

By: The BBC

The researchers recovered rocks from under the Gulf of Mexico that were hit by an asteroid 66 million years ago.

The nature of this material records the details of the event.

It is becoming clear that the 15km-wide asteroid could not have hit a worse place on Earth.

The shallow sea covering the target site meant colossal volumes of sulphur (from the mineral gypsum) were injected into the atmosphere, extending the “global winter” period that followed the immediate firestorm.

Had the asteroid struck a different location, the outcome might have been very different.

“This is where we get to the great irony of the story – because in the end it wasn’t the size of the asteroid, the scale of blast, or even its global reach that made dinosaurs extinct – it was where the impact happened,” said Ben Garrod, who presents The Day The Dinosaurs Died with Alice Roberts.

“Had the asteroid struck a few moments earlier or later, rather than hitting shallow coastal waters it might have hit deep ocean.

“An impact in the nearby Atlantic or Pacific oceans would have meant much less vapourised rock – including the deadly gypsum. The cloud would have been less dense and sunlight could still have reached the planet’s surface, meaning what happened next might have been avoided.

“In this cold, dark world food ran out of the oceans within a week and shortly after on land. With nothing to eat anywhere on the planet, the mighty dinosaurs stood little chance of survival.”

Read More ☺️

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

Trump Fires James Comey 

By: MICHAEL D. SHEAR and MATT APUZZO of The New York Times

President Trump has fired the director of the F.B.I., James B. Comey, over his handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails, the White House said on Tuesday.

Mr. Comey was leading an investigation into whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to influence the 2016 election.

“While I greatly appreciate you informing me, on three separate occasions, that I am not under investigation, I nevertheless concur with the judgment of the Department of Justice that you are not able to effectively lead the bureau,” Mr. Trump said in a letter to Mr. Comey dated Tuesday.

“It is essential that we find new leadership for the F.B.I. that restores public trust and confidence in its vital law enforcement mission,” Mr. Trump wrote.

Officials at the F.B.I. said they were not immediately aware of Mr. Comey’s dismissal, which Mr. Trump described as effective immediately.

In a separate letter released at the White House, Mr. Spicer said that the president informed the director that he has been “terminated and removed from office.”

Memos released by the White House show that Rod J. Rosenstein, the newly sworn-in deputy attorney general, that recommended Mr. Comey be fired over how he disclosed the investigation into Mrs. Clinton.

Mr. Comey broke with longstanding tradition and policies by discussing the case and chastising the Democratic presidential nominee’s “careless” handling of classified information. Then, in the campaign’s final days, Mr. Comey announced that the F.B.I. was reopening the case, a move that earned him widespread criticism.

Read more ☺️

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

EPA Removes Scientific Board And Seeks To Replace Them With Industry Minded Individual 

By: Oliver Milman of The Guardian 

The Environmental Protection Agency has “eviscerated” a key scientific review board by removing half its members and seeking to replace them with industry-aligned figures, according to the board’s chair.

Scott Pruitt, the EPA administrator, has chosen not to renew the terms of nine of the 18-member board of scientific counselors, which advises the EPA on the quality and accuracy of the science it produces. The group, largely made up of academics, is set to be replaced by representatives from industries that the EPA regulates.

Deborah Swackhamer, chair of the board, said that with other planned departures, the panel was left with five members, including her, in the midst of an EPA hiring freeze.
“The committee has been eviscerated,” she told the Guardian. “We assumed these people would be renewed and there was no reason or indication they wouldn’t be. These people aren’t Obama appointees, they are scientific appointees. To have a political decision to get rid of them was a shock.”

The nine departing members – who worked on matters including toxic water pollution, climate change and chemical safety – all completed three-year terms. The decision to not renew those terms has opened the way for the Trump administration to refashion the scientific board in line with its industry-friendly agenda that has sought to strip away various pollution rules in the name of “regulatory certainty”.

Read More 😊

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

Chemical Attack In Syria Kills over 100

Compliments of ITV

A hundred people have been killed and 400 injured in an apparent chemical attack in the rebel-held town of Idlib in Syria.

The fumes caused many people to choke and pictures and video emerged showing people limping, struggling to breathe and even foaming at the mouth.
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) revised the death toll which they said was caused by a warplane releasing “toxic gas” in a residential area in the early hours of Tuesday.
They confirmed 11 children were among the dead and at least 160 were injured.
A short time later, a hospital in the town where doctors were treating the victims was bombed.
The entrance to the building was hit, bringing down rubble on top of medics who were earlier seen helping wash away chemical residue on patients.
Theresa May said she was “appalled” by the apparent chemical attack and called for an urgent investigation.

The Prime Minister, currently on a trade and security visit to the Middle East, said: “We condemn the use of chemical weapons in all circumstances. If proven [to be a chemical attack] it is further evidence of the barbarism of the Syrian regime.
“The UK has led international efforts to call to account the Syrian regime and Daesh and the use of chemical weapons.
“I am very clear there can be no future for Assad in a stable Syria, and I call on all parties involved to ensure we have a transition away from Assad.
“We cannot allow this suffering to continue”.
Read More 😊

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

Space X Makes History

By: Loren Grush of The Verge

After more than two years of landing its rockets after launch, SpaceX finally sent one of its used Falcon 9s back into space. The rocket took off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, this evening, sending a communications satellite into orbit, and then landed on one of SpaceX’s drone ships floating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was round two for this particular rocket, which already launched and landed during a mission in April of last year. But the Falcon 9’s relaunch marks the first time an orbital rocket has launched to space for a second time.
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk appeared on the company’s live stream shortly after the landing and spoke about the accomplishment. “It means you can fly and refly an orbital class booster, which is the most expensive part of the rocket. This is going to be, ultimately, a huge revolution in spaceflight,” he said.

After more than two years of landing its rockets after launch, SpaceX finally sent one of its used Falcon 9s back into space. The rocket took off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, this evening, sending a communications satellite into orbit, and then landed on one of SpaceX’s drone ships floating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was round two for this particular rocket, which already launched and landed during a mission in April of last year. But the Falcon 9’s relaunch marks the first time an orbital rocket has launched to space for a second time.
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk appeared on the company’s live stream shortly after the landing and spoke about the accomplishment. “It means you can fly and refly an orbital class booster, which is the most expensive part of the rocket. This is going to be, ultimately, a huge revolution in spaceflight,” he said.
THIS EVENING’S MISSION WAS A CRITICAL MILESTONE FOR SPACEX

This evening’s mission was a critical milestone for SpaceX, which has been working to make its rockets partially reusable since as early as 2011. Up until now, practically all orbital rockets have been expendable, so they’re basically thrown away once they launch into space. That means an entirely new rocket — which can cost tens to hundreds of millions of dollars to make — has to be built for each mission to orbit. SpaceX’s strategy has been to land its rockets after launch in an effort to fly them again and again. That way the company can partially save on manufacturing costs for each mission.

SpaceX doesn’t save the entire Falcon 9 rocket after each launch though. It saves the first stage — the 14-story core of the Falcon 9 that contains the main engines and most of the fuel needed for launch. About a few minutes after takeoff, the first stage separates from the top of the rocket and makes a controlled descent back to Earth — either landing on solid ground or on one of the company’s autonomous drone ships in the ocean. Prior to tonight’s launch, SpaceX had attempted 13 of these rocket landings and eight vehicles had successfully stuck the touchdown. But as SpaceX slowly acquired a growing stockpile of recovered rockets these last two years, the company had yet to actually reuse one of these vehicles.

Read More ☺️

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

R.I.P Chuck Berry

By:Bruce Fessier Of KSDK

According to the St. Charles County Police Department, legendary musician Chuck Berry has died.

He was 90 years old.

Police said Saturday they responded to a medical emergency on Buckner Road around 12:40 p.m. Inside the home, first responders spoke with a caretaker who was caring for an unresponsive man and administered lifesaving techniques.

The 90-year-old man, later identified as Charles Edward Anderson Berry Sr., better known as legendary musician Chuck Berry, could not be revived and was pronounced deceased at 1:26 p.m.

Berry is widely viewed as among the most influential artists in rock ‘n’ roll with hits like Johnny B. Goode, Never Can Tell, and Roll Over Beethoven. Berry influenced artists like the Rolling Stones, The Beatles, Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, The Who and Pink Floyd.

The Beatles had hits with Berry compositions such as Roll Over Beethoven, Rock and Roll Music and Sweet Little Sixteen, and McCartney called Berry “one of greatest poets America has ever produced” in an introduction to the 2014 release of Berry’s complete studio recordings.

Read more 😊

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

Virgin Has A Space Shuttle And Stephen Hawking Will Sit Shotgun

By: Andrew Griffin of The Independent

Stephen Hawking is going to go to space.

The cosmologist and physicist will leave the Earth on board Richard Branson’s spaceship, he has said.

Professor Hawking told Good Morning Britain that he’d never dreamed he’d be able to head into space. But “Richard Branson has offered me a seat on Virgin Galactic, and I said yes immediately”, he said.

Richard Branson’s spaceflight company, Virgin Galactic, hopes soon to carry people into space on commercial missions. Mr Branson had suggested that he might be able to complete a flight in 2009, but the plan has been thrown off by a range of problems and disasters.

In a wide-ranging interview, he said that his “three children have brought me great joy – and I can tell you what will make me happy, to travel in space”.

Professor Hawking also discussed Donald Trump, who he said was a “demagogue” and made him fear that he might never be welcome in the US. “”His priority will be to satisfy his electorate who are neither liberal, nor that well-informed,” he said.
Read More 😊

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

Iran Sets The Bar On Refugee Treatment 

By: Bethan McKernan Beirut of The Independent

Iran, one of the states targeted by Donald Trump’s Muslim ban, is a country from which the US could learn a lot on the resettlement of refugees, the UN has said.

The Soviet War in Afghanistan displaced six million people to neighbouring Iran and Pakistan in 1979. Almost four decades later, the Tehran government still shelters around one million registered Afghans, and up to two million are thought to also be living in the country – making Iran home to the world’s fourth largest refugee population.

“The leadership demonstrated by the Iranian government has been exemplary in hosting refugees and keeping borders open,” Sivanka Dhanapala, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Tehran, said on Wednesday.

“It’s a story that’s not told often enough.”

The remarks come as Mr Trump’s administration tries to resuscitate its travel ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries, and halt the resettlement of Syrian refugees.

Iran, one of the states targeted by Donald Trump’s Muslim ban, is a country from which the US could learn a lot on the resettlement of refugees, the UN has said.

The Soviet War in Afghanistan displaced six million people to neighbouring Iran and Pakistan in 1979. Almost four decades later, the Tehran government still shelters around one million registered Afghans, and up to two million are thought to also be living in the country – making Iran home to the world’s fourth largest refugee population.

“The leadership demonstrated by the Iranian government has been exemplary in hosting refugees and keeping borders open,” Sivanka Dhanapala, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Tehran, said on Wednesday.

“It’s a story that’s not told often enough.”

The remarks come as Mr Trump’s administration tries to resuscitate its travel ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries, and halt the resettlement of Syrian refugees.

Iran army general threatens to give US ‘slap in the face’

The new ban – which could affect the one million Iranian nationals living and studying in the US – was slapped down on Wednesday by a federal court in Hawaii on the grounds it could cause “irreparable injury.”

It was ironic, Mr Dhanapala noted, that Iranians could be barred from the US while continuing to deal with the human fallout of the American conflict with the Soviet Union.

While Afghans resident in Iran – especially those who are undocumented – are often marginalised to the fringes of society as poorly paid manual workers, and are not allowed to apply for citizenship, the Tehran government has also recently taken positive steps such as ordering schools to take in all Afghan children, and embarked on a health insurance scheme that covers refugees.

The UN is fostering hopes that the country will ease work permit restrictions and register more undocumented Afghans in the future.
Read More 😊

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome 

China To Replace All Fossil Fueled Taxis With Electric Cars 

By: Steve Hanley Of Clean Technica

Taxis are the bane of all urban areas. Typically, they are poorly made, poorly maintained, and spew tons of carbon dioxide into the air every day as they shuttle people from place to place. Beijing has nearly 70,000 taxis. It also has an intractable problem with smog. While it has embarked on an aggressive program to encourage private citizens to buy what it calls “new energy vehicles” — hybrids, plug-in hybrids, and battery-operated cars — that push has not made much of an impact on the taxi fleet in China’s capital. Now it has announced a plan to replace all 67,000 fossil-fueled taxis in the city with electric cars.

The changeover won’t happen right away. It begins with a mandate that any new taxis placed in service must be electric, but that means it could be a decade or more before all older vehicles are replaced. The project is expected to cost taxi operators $1.3 billion before it is complete. The entry-level fossil-fueled cars in use today cost about $10,000. Equivalent electric cars cost twice as much.

China is paying the price for its rapid economic expansion, most of which has been powered by electricity generated in coal-fired facilities. During the recent Olympic games in Beijing, it ordered many factories to shut down for weeks and banned buses and vehicles from its streets. The plan worked, as millions of Beijing residents saw the sun for the first time in months, but it came at a huge economic cost.

A study in 2015 found that air pollution was responsible for up to 4,000 premature deaths a day throughout China. Last month, government officials ordered a local company called Air Matters to stop reporting pollution levels that exceed the government’s official air quality index of 500. No better way to solve a problem than by officially ignoring it.

Read More 😊

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring 
  • Useful 
  • Interesting 
  • Awesome