5.1 EARTHQUAKE EVENT IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

A M5.1 earthquake occurred at 9:09PM, March 28th, 2014 located 1 mile easy of La Habra, CA, or 4 miles north of Fullerton, CA. The event was felt widely throughout Orange, Los Angeles, Ventura, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties.  It was preceded by two foreshocks, the larger of M3.6 at 8:03pm.

THIS IS THE SECOND SIGNIFICANT EARTHQUAKE EVENT THIS MONTH.  IT IS JUST A MATTER OF TIME BEFORE A MORE SIZABLE EVENT WILL OCCUR.  PLEASE USE THIS WEEKEND AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A PLANS & GET PREPARED.

  • For more information on this event visit the USGS and the SHAKEMAP pages for details.
  • Earthquake preparedness information and resources are provided on the TRN DAPP #911 Portal.  http://dapp.trn.tv.
  • Download helpful emergency apps from the American Red Cross HERE (Android) including the Earthquake App on ANDROID and IPHONE.

THE AMERICAN RED CROSS EARTHQUAKE APP DESCRIPTION:

  • Be ready for an earthquake with Earthquake by American Red Cross. Get notified when an earthquake occurs, prepare your family and home, find help and let others know you are safe even if the power is out – a must have for anyone who lives in an earthquake-prone area or has loved ones who do.

    FEATURES:
    •Step-by-step instructions let you know what to do even before/during/after an earthquake, even if no data connectivity.
    •Get notified when an earthquake occurs; see the intensity impact to your area or those of loved-ones with notifications generated by the United States Geological Survey (USGS).
    •Let family and friends know you are okay with the customizable “I’m Safe” alert for Facebook, Twitter, email and text.
    •Find open Red Cross shelters in your area when you need help.
    •Stay safe when the lights are out with the Toolkit, including a strobe light, flashlight and audible alert functions.
    •Prepare for the worst by learning how to assemble an emergency kit for your family in the event of power outage or evacuation.
    •Empower your family to stay safe and remain calm in an emergency by learning how to make and practice an emergency plan.
    •Earn badges that you can share with your friends and show off your hurricane knowledge with interactive quizzes.
    •See an illustrated history of earthquakes in your area.
    •Know how to what to do about food and drinking water when your area has been impacted by floods and power outages.

THE AMERICAN RED CROSS EARTHQUAKE APPS

Download helpful emergency apps from the American Red Cross HERE (Android) including the Earthquake App on ANDROID and IPHONE.

THE AMERICAN RED CROSS EARTHQUAKE APP DESCRIPTION:

  • Be ready for an earthquake with Earthquake by American Red Cross. Get notified when an earthquake occurs, prepare your family and home, find help and let others know you are safe even if the power is out – a must have for anyone who lives in an earthquake-prone area or has loved ones who do.FEATURES:
    •Step-by-step instructions let you know what to do even before/during/after an earthquake, even if no data connectivity.
    •Get notified when an earthquake occurs; see the intensity impact to your area or those of loved-ones with notifications generated by the United States Geological Survey (USGS).
    •Let family and friends know you are okay with the customizable “I’m Safe” alert for Facebook, Twitter, email and text.
    •Find open Red Cross shelters in your area when you need help.
    •Stay safe when the lights are out with the Toolkit, including a strobe light, flashlight and audible alert functions.
    •Prepare for the worst by learning how to assemble an emergency kit for your family in the event of power outage or evacuation.
    •Empower your family to stay safe and remain calm in an emergency by learning how to make and practice an emergency plan.
    •Earn badges that you can share with your friends and show off your hurricane knowledge with interactive quizzes.
    •See an illustrated history of earthquakes in your area.
    •Know how to what to do about food and drinking water when your area has been impacted by floods and power outages.

Guinea Ebola outbreak spreading to Liberia, threatening Sierra Leone

The Ebola outbreak in Guinea – the biggest in Africa in seven years — has spread to neighboring Liberia and is now also threatening Sierra Leone.

Mali and Ivory Coast issued calls for vigilance to prevent the disease from spreading across their borders. The two countries border Guinea along with Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea-Bissau, and Senegal. TheGuardian reports that five people have died from the disease in Lofa county in northern Liberia.

At least eighty-six cases and fifty-nine deaths have been recorded across Guinea, the West African country’s health ministry said Monday. The UNChildren’s Fund said the outbreak had spread to the capital, Conakry, although most of the cases so far have been in the country’s south-east provinces.

Continue reading Guinea Ebola outbreak spreading to Liberia, threatening Sierra Leone

Lightening: Myths & Facts

From the National Preparedness Community

 

The lightning threat in the U.S. is very real and impacts people in every state. Though lightning strikes peak in summer, people are struck year round. In the United States, an average of 60 people are killed each year by lightning, and hundreds more are severely injured. Often, these injuries and deaths are due to misinformation around the seriousness of thunderstorms and lightning. Below you’ll find the truth behind ten common myths about lightning.

Remember: When thunder roars, go indoors.  

Myth: If it is not raining, then there is no danger from lightning.
Fact: Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall. This is especially true in the western United States where thunderstorms sometimes produce very little rain.

Myth: The rubber soles of shoes or rubber tires on a car will protect you from being struck by lightning.
Fact: Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning. The steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal. Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.

Myth: “Heat lightning” occurs after very hot summer days and poses no threat.
Fact: “Heat lightning” is a term used to describe lightning from a thunderstorm too far away for the thunder to be heard.

Myth: Lightning never strikes the same place twice.
Fact: Lightning often strikes the same place repeatedly, especially if it’s a tall, pointy, isolated object. The Empire State Building is hit nearly 100 times a year.

Myth: If it’s not raining or there aren’t clouds overhead, you’re safe from lightning.
Fact: Lightning often strikes more than three miles from the center of the thunderstorm, far outside the rain or thunderstorm cloud. “Bolts from the blue” can strike 10-15 miles from the thunderstorm.

Myth: A lightning victim is electrified. If you touch them, you’ll be electrocuted.
Fact: The human body does not store electricity. It is perfectly safe to touch a lightning victim to give them first aid. This is the most chilling of lightning Myths. Imagine if someone died because people were afraid to give CPR! Call 9-1-1 and begin CPR immediately if the person has stopped breathing. Use an Automatic External Defibrillator if one is available. Contact your local American Red Cross chapter for information on CPR and first aid classes.

Myth: If outside in a thunderstorm, you should seek shelter under a tree to stay dry.
Fact: Being underneath a tree is the second leading cause of lightning casualties. Better to get wet than fried!

Myth: If you are in a house, you are 100% safe from lightning.
Fact: A house is a safe place to be during a thunderstorm as long as you avoid anything that conducts electricity. This means staying off corded phones, electrical appliances, wires, TV cables, computers, plumbing, metal doors and windows. Windows are hazardous for two reasons: wind generated during a thunderstorm can blow objects into the window, breaking it and causing glass to shatter and second, in older homes, in rare instances, lightning can come in cracks in the sides of windows.

Myth: If thunderstorms threaten while you are outside playing a game, it is okay to finish it before seeking shelter.
Fact: Many lightning casualties occur because people do not seek shelter soon enough. No game is worth death or life-long injuries. Seek proper shelter immediately if you hear thunder. Adults are responsible for the safety of children.

Myth: If trapped outside and lightning is about to strike, I should lie flat on the ground.
Fact: Lying flat increases your chance of being affected by potentially deadly ground current. If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm, you keep moving toward a safe shelter.

Question for the Community:

Are there any other myths about thunderstorms or lightning worth mentioning?
How have you dealt with lightning in the past?
Have you developed a lightning safety plan?

by Thomas Francisco – Community Manager (Contractor) – GovDelivery (5 days ago)

For more preparedness information visit TRN’s DAPP Portal #911

4.4 Earthquake Event in Southern California

4.4 EARTHQUAKE EVENT IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA,  6:25AM, Monday, March 17th, 2014.  The epicenter was in the Santa Monica mountains between Westwood and Encino California.  It was felt throughout Los Angeles County and according to Lucy Jones, US Geological Survey, it was the largest earthquake event for this area since Northridge, CA,  in 1994.

For more information on this event see the USGS and the SHAKEMAP for more details.

IT IS JUST A MATTER OF TIME BEFORE A SIZABLE EVENT WILL OCCUR.  THIS IS A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO PLEASE  MAKE A PLAN & GET PREPARED.

Get earthquake preparedness information and resources on the TRN DAPP #911 Portal.  http://dapp.trn.tv.

Severe Weather Preparedness

From The National Preparedness Community

National Severe Weather Preparedness Week.  

Severe weather can happen anytime. In May 2013, tornadoes devastated parts of central Oklahoma. This outbreak included the deadliest tornado of the year on May 19 in Moore, Oklahoma. At least 70 tornadoes spanned seven Midwestern states in November 2013.

During National Severe Weather Preparedness Week, March 2-8, 2014, NOAA and FEMA will highlight the importance of preparing for severe weather before it strikes.

We invite you to download the media toolkit below to promote National Severe Weather Preparedness Week in your community.

Severe Weather Preparedness Week Toolkit.pdfThe toolkit includes: background information on how to take the next step, talking points, a blog post template, an Op-Ed, and a Social Media toolkit including content to share on Twitter and Facebook.